Sunday, March 23, 2014

Now You Can Eat Lots Of Chocolate ....

Picture from Flickr
Lots of dark chocolate at least. Here's why, certain bacteria in our stomach ferment cocoa into anti-inflammatory compounds that is good for our heart. It also reduces the long term risk of stroke. Need any more reasons to eat dark chocolate?

That's the latest findings Dr John Finley and his colleagues from Louisiana State University presented at a national meeting of the American Chemical Society.

How can you put these findings to use immediately? Before you go and gorge all the dark chocolate you can get your hands on, the authors suggest that it is important to stick to unsweetened raw cocoa powder. Best way is to mix it in oatmeal or a smoothie. Or make sue your dark chocolate has a high percentage of cocoa to get the most health benefits.

Have a look at the paper from the American Chemical Society

Saturday, March 15, 2014

Introduction To Kinesio Taping 150314

"My hand can tape better than your hand"
Probably due to the school holidays, we had a few people who signed up but could not come to the Introduction to Kinesio Taping course @ Sports Solutions Holland Village. But we still had a few athletes, cyclists, a personal trainer and 2 Physiotherapists amongst those who came for the course today.

Here are some pictures from the course.

Here's Munira doing a muscle test on Sarah
What kind of taping is that for his shirt??
Gently now 
Email us at admin@sportssolutions.com.sg if you're keen to come to the next Introduction to Kinesio Taping course.

Saturday, February 15, 2014

Not Your Hamstrings Again?

Photo by Jarrett Truscott from flickr
Hands up all of you who have had a hamstring injury, knows someone who has or have difficulty treating a patient with a hamstring injury (for the physios reading this). Clearly hamstring injuries are very common, very prone to re-injury and incredibly frustrating to treat as well.

Just ask Steven Gerrard, Glen Johnson and his other team mates at Liverpool Football club. Wasn't Fernando Torres plagued by hamstring injuries during his time at Liverpool too?

That glorious night in Istanbul. 
Speaking of Liverpool, the medical staff at the football club published a very fascinating paper (in the British Journal of Sports Medicine) on how they treated one of their player's difficult and recurrent hamstring problem.

Without disclosing any names, this player had hurt his hamstrings (5 times in 5 months), under 23 years old then, from an African/ Caribbean background, previous knee injuries, history of groin problems and poor hamstring to quadriceps strength ration. Yes, the above mentioned factors are risk factors for a hamstring injury.

The Liverpool medical staff came up with the following  treatment plan. First they corrected his functional leg length difference and his pelvis (or hip) - he saw an osteopath based in Germany for his hip.

Through some cortisone injections and nerve stretches, he had his neurodynamics addressed.

Following that they focused on his core muscles, not just any core muscle, specifically transversus abdominis and multifidus. (So if your Pilates instructor, Physiotherapist or trainer etc doesn't teach you how to activate your transversus abdominis and/ or multifidus, you're not training your core). After increasing his eccentric (or lengthening) hamstring strength, he kept his hamstring length supple with Yoga, regular hamstring stretches and low back stretches.

Since early return to running has been shown to reduce subsequent injury risk, he underwent an overload running program of the following 3 days cycle. Day one was speed running, day two aerobic base running and day 3 was off feet conditioning - bike and my favourite of course pool work.

He also had Actovegin (calf blood extract) and Traumeel injections. Cycling fans may remember Lance Armstrong used both Actovegin and Traumeel to aid his recovery. These substances are not illegal.

Well, there you have it, a complete treatment plan for hamstring injuries. You many also want to read this or another earlier post we wrote on hamstring injuries.

Reference

Brukner P, Nealon A, Morgan C et al (2013). Recurrent Hamstring Muscle Injury: Applying The Limited Evidence In The Professional Football Setting With a Seven-point Programme. BJSM. doi:10.1136/bjsports-2012-091400.

*Liverpool picture by Kevin Mustong from flickr

Saturday, January 25, 2014

Krispy Kreme Fans Rejoice

Seriously, even Subway?
The first Krispy Kreme outlet in Singapore opened to much fanfare on 121013. Fans queued overnight hoping to win a year's weekly supply of a dozen original glazed doughnuts for being the first in the queue, the second a six-month's supply while the third in line a three-month's supply.

Now be honest you lot, did you queue too?

Well, now it seems that Krispy Kreme fans may rejoice over this. According to a new report by Credit Suisse, you may be better off eating a Krispy Kreme doughnut than some other stuff marketed as healthy. There are nine surprising types of food and drinks that have more sugar than a Krispy Kreme doughnut, which at 10 grams of sugar seems much healthier by comparison.

My mama said orange juice is good for me  ....
Well, before you go pig out on the Krispy Kreme's, bear in mind that it is still sugar and not obesity that causes diabetes. Don't rejoice too much just yet.....

Wow, even Vitamin water?

Sunday, January 12, 2014

"I Guarantee You'll Win."

Patch Adams
"You treat a disease, you win, you lose. You treat a person, I'll guarantee you'll win." Patch Adams.

Hunter Doherty "Patch" Adams, an American physician, social activist, clown and author (made famous in the 1998 movie by actor Robin Williams) is the founder of  Gesundheit! institute. He promotes an alternative health care model, developing compassionate connections with patients while relying on humour and play (which is not covered by insurance).

Each year, he organizes a group of volunteers dressing up as clowns travelling to various countries to bring humour to patients, orphans and others.

That's what we try our best to do at our 2 clinics Physio and Sports Solutions - treat you and the cause of your pain. But not being clowns though.

Wednesday, December 18, 2013

Get Nutty

Picture by Martin LaBar from flickr.com
After reading through this, you may find more reason to get nutty..... eat more nuts that is.

In an observational study published recently from the the New England Journal of Medicine, researchers found that frequent nut consumption was associated with a lower risk of all-cause and disease specific death.

The studied 118000 people over 30 years and found that those who ate at least a one-ounce serving of nuts seven or more times a week had 20% lower risk of all-cause death (compared to people who did not eat nuts).

There are about 20-25 almonds and 15-20 peanuts or cashews in a one ounce serving.

Compared to those who didn't eat nuts frequently in the study, the regular "nutties" were leaner, less likely to smoke, more likely to exercise, take multivitamin supplements, eat more fruits and veggies and drink alcohol.

In addition, eating nuts five or more times a week was associated with 11% lower risk of cancer-related death, 24% lower risk of death from respiratory disease, 25% lower risk of cardiovascular-related death and a 29% lower risk of heart disease. Very good incentive to eat more nuts if you ask me.

Both peanuts and tree nuts (pecans, almonds, pine nuts, walnuts etc) had similar effects on lowering mortality.

Well, now you know what should be at the top of your grocery shopping list.

Reference

Bao Y, Han JL, Hu FB et al (2013). Association Of Nut Consumption With Total And Cause-specific
Mortality. NEJM. 369:2001-2011. doi: 10.1056/NEJMoa1307352.

http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMoa1307352



Sunday, December 8, 2013

Get Rid Of Your Neck Pain

Tini in her poke chin posture (posed picture)
Sitting in a sustained forward flexion (or poke chin) posture makes your neck pain worse due to increased loading in the cervical spine and deformation in the connective tissue.

Read here to find out how to treat your chronic neck pain.